Britt Drögemöller

 

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RESEARCH

I have applied genomic analyses to understand how human variation contributes to disease susceptibility and treatment outcomes

 

ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS TO CHEMOTHERAPY

Chemotherapeutics are highly effective in the treatment of cancer.
Severe adverse drug reactions are a serious limitation of these treatments.

Using genome-wide association studies I have identified genetic variants that contribute to the development of adverse drug reactions such as cisplatin-induced hearing loss and L-asparaginase-induced pancreatitis. This information is currently being used to develop strategies to prevent the occurrence of these adverse drug reactions.

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NON-RESPONSE TO ANTIPSYCHOTICS

Antipsychotics are integral to the treatment of schizophrenia.
These treatments are only effective in approximately 60% of patients.

Using exome sequencing and I have identified genetic variants contributing to non-response to antipsychotics. These data have provided insight into the genetic variation present in South African schizophrenia patients and the role that this variation plays in non-response to antipsychotics.

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RARE DISEASES

Whole genome/exome sequencing strategies provide the ability to identify genetic variants causing rare and potentially treatable diseases.

I am part of the team that uses exome sequencing to identify genetic variants contributing to inborn errors of metabolism. This work has resulted in increased diagnosis rates and the testing of targeted interventions in a subset of patients. 

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PHARMACOGENETICS in the CONTEXT of AFRICA

The current disparities in genomics research and high burdens of disease in Africa drive the need to perform pharmacogenomics research in Africa.

Using sequencing technologies, I have identified novel pharmacogenetic variants that are present in African individuals. The identification of these variants has contributed to improving phenotype-genotype correlations in individuals of African descent.  

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